A Touch of Light

A step towards enlightenment for those living in the world of darkness.

A Young India Fellowship Initiative in collaboration with University of Pennsylvania


      





Saturday, November 26, 2011

Getting ready to release the 1st version



video

Huhuuu! After facing lots of troubles at every step, we were finally able to get the project working by seamlessly integrating all the components. The video above shows as to how Kinect is able to detect an object (human in our case) and give an alarm depending on the distance between the human and Kinect. In our case, we have used three vibration motors for producing these alert signals. Each motor is used to send an alert for obstacle in one particular direction namely, left, right or middle. These three motors would help a visually impaired person in identifying the direction in which the obstacle is present. We hope to transfer this functionality on the belt in a day or two.This would mark the end of first phase of our project where we were supposed to make a working prototype of the viSparsh Belt.

Wednesday, November 23, 2011

Solving the Response Time Problem


The response time of the data transmitted by the Kinect to the BeagleBoard came to around 4-5 seconds which was quite contrary to our expectations. By 'Response Time' we mean the 'time lag' between two samples of data transmitted by the Kinect to the BeagleBoard.

In order to solve this problem we tried running the same on the PandaBoard and Hurray! the problem got solved. Response time decreased to a few milliseconds. Though both have the 1Ghz processor but BeagleBoard has 512MB DDR RAM whereas PandaBoard has 1GB DDR2 RAM.

Active USB Hub: The way out for our Kinect Detection Problem



To our utter surprise, Kinect stopped working all of a sudden. On running Kinect sample programs, it was not able to detect the device as mentioned in one of our previous posts. However few days back, we were able to find the solution for this. After trying all possible combinations like the software error possibilities etc., we were finally left with trying out the Active USB Hub option. And Hurray!, it actually worked. The problem was that although Kinect runs on a 12V adapter , it still draws ample amount of current from the USB port to which it is connected. Thus, while connecting Kinect to BeagleBoard/PandaBoard, Kinect was not able to draw to draw sufficient amount of current from the board. Thus, on connecting Kinect through the Active USB Hub instead of the board directly, we were able to remove Kinect detection problem.

Saturday, November 26, 2011

Getting ready to release the 1st version



video

Huhuuu! After facing lots of troubles at every step, we were finally able to get the project working by seamlessly integrating all the components. The video above shows as to how Kinect is able to detect an object (human in our case) and give an alarm depending on the distance between the human and Kinect. In our case, we have used three vibration motors for producing these alert signals. Each motor is used to send an alert for obstacle in one particular direction namely, left, right or middle. These three motors would help a visually impaired person in identifying the direction in which the obstacle is present. We hope to transfer this functionality on the belt in a day or two.This would mark the end of first phase of our project where we were supposed to make a working prototype of the viSparsh Belt.

Wednesday, November 23, 2011

Solving the Response Time Problem


The response time of the data transmitted by the Kinect to the BeagleBoard came to around 4-5 seconds which was quite contrary to our expectations. By 'Response Time' we mean the 'time lag' between two samples of data transmitted by the Kinect to the BeagleBoard.

In order to solve this problem we tried running the same on the PandaBoard and Hurray! the problem got solved. Response time decreased to a few milliseconds. Though both have the 1Ghz processor but BeagleBoard has 512MB DDR RAM whereas PandaBoard has 1GB DDR2 RAM.

Active USB Hub: The way out for our Kinect Detection Problem



To our utter surprise, Kinect stopped working all of a sudden. On running Kinect sample programs, it was not able to detect the device as mentioned in one of our previous posts. However few days back, we were able to find the solution for this. After trying all possible combinations like the software error possibilities etc., we were finally left with trying out the Active USB Hub option. And Hurray!, it actually worked. The problem was that although Kinect runs on a 12V adapter , it still draws ample amount of current from the USB port to which it is connected. Thus, while connecting Kinect to BeagleBoard/PandaBoard, Kinect was not able to draw to draw sufficient amount of current from the board. Thus, on connecting Kinect through the Active USB Hub instead of the board directly, we were able to remove Kinect detection problem.